60LCM 60mm f/12 achromatic go-to altazimuth refractor

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LCM Mount
The LCM mount’s single fork arm is made of die cast aluminum. It is rigid and damps vibrations quickly. The optical tube mounts onto the fork arm using a no-tool quick-release dovetail bracket for fast set-up, take-down, and balancing. This allows you to use the mount with other lightweight optical tubes that have the appropriate dovetail.

    The mount includes pre-installed enclosed dual DC servo motor drives – one for moving the scope in altitude (up/down) and one for azimuth (right/left). The combined motion of the two motors allows the scope to move smoothly in an arc across the sky, following the seemingly curved path taken by the stars and planets. Built-in electronics let you select the appropriate lunar, solar, or sidereal (star) tracking rate to keep each specific kind of object centered in the field of view so that several people can observe at their leisure without having constantly to adjust the position of the scope. The electronics also give you a choice of nine different slewing and centering speeds for locating objects (3°/sec, 2°/sec, 1°/sec, 0.5°/sec, and 32x/16x/8x/4x/2x the sidereal rates).

    A compartment in the drive base holds eight user-supplied AA batteries for powering the telescope. All power connections to the motors are internal. This eliminates the cord wrap problems you often find with competitive telescopes powered by an external battery pack that connects to the scope through a dangling power cord.

    To conserve battery life when the telescope is being used in the backyard, an optional AC adapter (#2338N) is available to operate the scope from an extension cord connected to a normal household 110 VAC electric outlet. The Celestron Power Tank (#4512V) is also a highly recommended optional accessory if you observe away from home a lot. This is a 7 amp-hour capacity multi-purpose rechargeable 12V DC battery that can provide several nights worth of observing from a single charge when you’re in the field away from backyard AC.

    The underside of the mount’s drive base has three round feet that rest on three flat pads inside the tripod head. The drive base is held in place on the tripod by one large hand-tighten knob in the underside of the tripod. Assembly is fast and foolproof. There is no need to fumble with multiple mounting bolts, or try to align mounting bolts in a tripod with holes you can’t see in the base of the mount, as is the case with competitive scopes. The LCM mount’s no-tool assembly is foolproof and takes only a few seconds.

    The preassembled adjustable-height tripod has aluminum legs that damp vibrations quickly. The center leg brace holds a convenient no-tool quick-release accessory tray to keep your eyepieces and accessories up and out of the dew-soaked grass. The locking levers for the tripod leg height adjustment face are on the sides of the legs, so they won’t snag your clothing as you move around the tripod in the dark. A bubble level in the center of the drive base lets you level the tripod for more accurate tracking of celestial objects.

LCM Computer
LCM Computer Hand Control: The supplied NexStar-based LCM computer hand control has an illuminated numeric keypad and a two-line 16-character LCD display. It stores in a holder that clips to one of the tripod legs. The telescope can be operated with the ergonomically-designed hand control conveniently docked in its holder. You can also remove the control and its coiled connecting cord from the holder for hand-held use. There is no need to worry about wrapping the cord around the mount as you walk around the scope to observe different parts of the sky. The hand control plugs into the fork arm rather than the drive base, so it always moves with the scope.

    The LCM computer has a database of 4,033 stars and objects that it can locate and track for you. The database includes the complete Messier and Caldwell catalogs of famous deep space objects; a selection of the brightest and best deep space objects from the Revised New General Catalog (NGC); selected SAO stars, including the best variable stars and multiple star systems; the planets; the Moon; the Sun; and more.

    With the LCM computer's hand control, you can select an object catalog at the touch of a button; automatically slew to any of the 4,033 objects in its memory, including over 600 galaxies, 300 star clusters, and dozens of beautiful binary stars; move to objects not in it’s data base under your command; change the slew speed; view fascinating information about an object, including enhanced information on many of the particularly fascinating objects; or simply determine if a desired object is visible in the sky. It can automatically take you on guided tours of the best objects visible in your sky the night you are observing, any night of the year. The computer’s hand control/database software and motor drive software can be flash upgraded via the internet so you will always have the most up-to-date software version available.

SkyAlign Technology: With Celestron’s SkyAlign technology, you don’t have to know Altair from Zubenelgenubi or know how to read a star chart to line up your LCM telescope on the sky. There is also no need to point the telescope north and level the optical tube or to pay extra for a competitive scope that levels the scope and points it north for you. With SkyAlign, the initial position of the telescope is irrelevant. Trees and buildings can block your view of the north celestial pole and you’ll still be able to properly align the scope on the sky. This makes for fast and very easy alignment of the telescope every time you take it out to observe.

    Simply input the date, time, and your location into the computer hand control. The LCM computer has a U.S. and international city database that lets you easily set your observing location. It will normally default to your last observing site automatically, but you can change to a new observing site anytime you want.

    Once you’ve entered the date, time, and location, use the StarPointer red dot LED finder to align the telescope on any three bright stars, or to two stars and a bright planet or even the Moon. You don’t need to know the names of the stars or the planet. The LCM computer system will automatically determine which objects were chosen and then generate an internal map of the sky that will let it move automatically to any star or object you select for the rest of the night. It does it by calculating the angles and distances measured between the objects you’ve chosen and then compares them to the known separations between objects. Using this method, the telescope determines what objects were chosen. The display will tell you which three objects you aligned to for confirmation.

    Only two of the alignment objects will actually be used for calculating the model of the sky that the computer uses for locating objects. The third object simply provides a positive identification of the other two. Therefore, at least two of the three alignment objects should be spaced at least 60 degrees apart in the sky if possible, and the third object should not fall in a straight line between the first two alignment stars.

    Since the brightest stars appear first as the sky darkens at dusk, the SkyAlign system is exceptionally easy to set up and use as night comes on. You don’t have to guess which stars are brightest, as only the brightest will be visible in the early evening. The same holds true for observers from a light-polluted suburban site, where only the brightest stars are visible to the unaided eye.

    Other alignment methods are also built into the LCM computer. Auto Two-Star Align asks you to choose and center the first alignment star, then the LCM computer automatically selects and slews to a second star for alignment. Two-Star Align lets you identify and manually slew your telescope to the two alignment stars. One-Star Align is the same as Two-Star Align, but only requires you to align to one known star. Although not as accurate as the other alignment methods, One-Star Align is the quickest way to find and track bright planets and objects in Altazimuth mode. Finally, Solar System Align displays a list of visible daytime objects (planets, the Moon, and the Sun) available to align the telescope for observing during the day.

    Once the scope has aligned itself with the sky, it takes only a few keystrokes on the computer hand control to have the scope move automatically to your first observing target and start tracking it so you can observe at your leisure. You can find hundreds of fascinating deep space objects your first night out, even if you have never used a telescope before. No matter what level of experience you start from, your Celestron LCM scope will unfold all the wonders of the Universe for you, your family, and your friends.

This Celestron telescope has:

• 60mm f/11.7 fully-coated achromatic refractor optics
• computerized go-to altazimuth mount
• pre-assembled aluminum tripod
• StarPointer red dot finder
• 25mm (28x) and 9mm (78x) 1.25” eyepieces
• 1.25” 90° star diagonal
• 2-year warranty

    You don’t have to know Altair from Zubenelgenubi or know how to read a star chart to find your way around the sky with the Celestron 60LCM 60mm go-to refractor. Its easy SkyAlign alignment technology and StarPointer red dot LED finder make lining up on the sky a breeze. Once aligned, the scope’s NexStar-technology computer hand control will find more than 4,000 celestial objects for you and will track them unerringly while you observe at your leisure. With its pre-assembled adjustable height aluminum tripod and easy no-tool assembly, the Celestron 60LCM can be up and ready to take you on a tour of the Universe in a matter of minutes.

    With the Celestron 60LCM you can see breathtaking views of the lunar landscape; Venus and its phases; Mars resolved as an orange disc; Jupiter and its 4 moons; Saturn resolved as a disc, with its rings plainly visible at medium and high magnification; plus binary stars, star clusters, nebulas, and much more outside the solar system.

    The Celestron 60LCM has all the features and optical performance needed to keep a casual backyard astronomer happily observing for years to come. And it can be used for terrestrial observing, too – birdwatching, scanning the scenery from the home with a view, and more.

This Telescope’s Optical System . . .

  • Achromatic refractor optical system: 60mm aperture (700mm focal length f/11.7) aluminum tube. The tube is connected to the mount by a no-tool quick release dovetail for fast assembly. Fully coated optics for high light transmission and good contrast. A good-sized lens shade is provided to shield the lens from ambient light for improved contrast and retard the formation of dew for maximum uninterrupted observing time.

  • Finder: StarPointer non-magnifying variable brightness illuminated red dot finder on a quick-release dovetail mounting bracket. The StarPointer is a quick and easy way to point your telescope exactly to the desired object in the sky. There’s no need to worry about the inverted images you see through traditional finders. Just align the red dot seen in the StarPointer with the desired star in the sky and you’re done.

  • Focuser: 1.25” rack and pinion.

  • Star diagonal: 1.25” 90° prism.

  • Two 1.25” eyepieces: The first is a 25mm providing a magnification of 28x. The eyepiece field of view is 1.6° across, more than three times wider than the diameter of the full Moon for expansive views of open star clusters and terrestrial observing. The second is a 9mm (78x) with a 0.57° field for more close-up views of the Moon, planets, and globular star clusters.

This Telescope’s Mount . . .

  • Fork mount/drive system: Single fork arm altazimuth design with pre-installed enclosed dual DC servo motor drives. A compartment in the drive base accepts eight user-supplied AA batteries for powering the telescope. An optional AC adapter and rechargeable battery pack are available to conserve battery life. For more details, click on the “mount” icon above.

  • LCM computer control: The supplied NexStar-technology computer hand control has an illuminated numeric keypad and a two-line 16-character LCD display. It has a database of 4,033 stars and objects it can find and track for you, including the complete Messier and Caldwell catalogs of famous deep space objects; a selection of the brightest and best deep space objects from the Revised New General Catalog (NGC); selected SAO stars, including the best variable stars and multiple star systems; the planets; the Moon; the Sun; and more.
    When you are ready to observe, simply input the date, time, and your location into the LCM computer hand control and use the StarPointer red dot finder to point the telescope at any three bright stars, or to two stars and a bright planet or the Moon. The LCM computer system will automatically align itself on the sky. Then, a few keystrokes on the LCM hand control and the computer automatically will slew your scope to any of the 4,033 objects in its memory you choose and track it so you can observe at your leisure. You can find hundreds of fascinating deep space objects your first night out, even if you have never used a telescope before. No matter what level of experience you start from, your LCM scope will unfold all the wonders of the Universe for you, your family, and your friends. For more details, click on the “computer” icon above.

  • Supplied software: The scope comes with a CD-ROM of TheSky X – First Light Edition planetarium and star charting software. This program is a computerized sky map that features a 10,000 object database, 75 color images, horizontal projection, custom sky chart printing, and zoom capability. It will let explore the Universe on your PC or Mac and print out custom star charts of the sky to help you find faint objects that are not in the LCM computer’s database.
    You can also add optional NexRemote telescope control software to allow you to more completely control the scope from your personal computer or laptop so you can keep your eyes on the stars instead of the hand control.

  • Adjustable height tripod: The preassembled tripod has aluminum legs to damp vibrations quickly. The center leg brace holds a convenient no-tool quick-release accessory tray to keep your eyepieces and accessories up and out of the dew-soaked grass. The tripod has maximum height of only 44”, however, so be aware that most of your observing will have to be done from a seated position.

  • Two-year warranty: All Celestron telescopes have a two-year warranty, double that of competitive scopes.
Highest Useful Magnification:
This is the highest visual power a telescope can achieve before the image becomes too dim for useful observing (generally at about 50x to 60x per inch of telescope aperture). However, this power is very often unreachable due to turbulence in our atmosphere that makes the image too blurry and unstable to see any detail.

On nights of less-than-perfect seeing, medium to low power planetary, binary star, and globular cluster observing (at 25x to 30x per inch of aperture or less) is usually more enjoyable than fruitlessly attempting to push a telescope's magnification to its theoretical limits. Very high powers are generally best reserved for planetary observations and binary star splitting.

Small aperture telescopes can usually use more power per inch of aperture on any given night than larger telescopes, as they look through a smaller column of air and see less of the turbulence in our atmosphere. While some observers use up to 100x per inch of refractor aperture on Mars and Jupiter, the actual number of minutes they spend observing at such powers is small in relation to the number of hours they spend waiting for the atmosphere to stabilize enough for them to use such very high powers.
140x
Visual Limiting Magnitude:
This is the magnitude (or brightness) of the faintest star that can be seen with a telescope. The larger the number, the fainter the star that can be seen. An approximate formula for determining the visual limiting magnitude of a telescope is 7.5 + 5 log aperture (in cm).

This is the formula that we use with all of the telescopes we carry, so that our published specs will be consistent from aperture to aperture, from manufacturer to manufacturer. Some telescope makers may use other unspecified methods to determine the limiting magnitude, so their published figures may differ from ours.

Keep in mind that this formula does not take into account light loss within the scope, seeing conditions, the observer’s age (visual performance decreases as we get older), the telescope’s age (the reflectivity of telescope mirrors decreases as they get older), etc. The limiting magnitudes specified by manufacturers for their telescopes assume very dark skies, trained observers, and excellent atmospheric transparency – and are therefore rarely obtainable under average observing conditions. The photographic limiting magnitude is always greater than the visual (typically by two magnitudes).

11.4
Focal Length:
This is the length of the effective optical path of a telescopeor eyepiece (the distance from the main mirror or lens where the lightis gathered to the point where the prime focus image is formed). Focallength is typically expressed in millimeters.

The longer the focallength, the higher the magnification and the narrower the field of viewwith any given eyepiece. The shorter the focal length, the lower themagnification and the wider the field of view with the same eyepiece.

700mm
Focal Ratio:
This is the ‘speed’ of a telescope’s optics, found by dividing the focal length by the aperture. The smaller the f/number, the lower the magnification, the wider the field, and the brighter the image with any given eyepiece or camera.

Fast f/4 to f/5 focal ratios are generally best for lower power wide field observing and deep space photography. Slow f/11 to f/15 focal ratios are usually better suited to higher power lunar, planetary, and binary star observing and high power photography. Medium f/6 to f/10 focal ratios work well with either.

An f/5 system can photograph a nebula or other faint extended deep space object in one-fourth the time of an f/10 system, but the image will be only one-half as large. Point sources, such as stars, are recorded based on the aperture, however, rather than the focal ratio – so that the larger the aperture, the fainter the star you can see or photograph, no matter what the focal ratio.

f/11.67
Resolution:
This is the ability of a telescope to separate closely-spaced binary stars into two distinct objects, measured in seconds of arc. One arc second equals 1/3600th of a degree and is about the width of a 25-cent coin at a distance of three miles! In essence, resolution is a measure of how much detail a telescope can reveal. The resolution values on our website are derived using the Dawes’ limit formula.

Dawes’ limit only applies to point sources of light (stars). Smaller separations can be resolved in extended objects, such as the planets. For example, Cassini’s Division in the rings of Saturn (0.5 arc seconds across), was discovered using a 2.5” telescope – which has a Dawes’ limit of 1.8 arc seconds!

The ability of a telescope to resolve to Dawes’ limit is usually much more affected by seeing conditions, by the difference in brightness between the binary star components, and by the observer’s visual acuity, than it is by the optical quality of the telescope.

1.93 arc seconds
Aperture:
This is the diameter of the light-gathering main mirror or objective lens of a telescope. In general, the larger the aperture, the better the resolution and the fainter the objects you can see.
2.4"
Weight:
The weight of this product.
10 lbs.
Telescope Type:
The optical design of a telescope.  Telescope type is classified by three primary optical designs (refractor, reflector, or catadioptric), by sub-designs of these types, or by the task they perform.
Refractor
Warranty:
2 years
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General Accessories
Drive Motors and Drive Accessories (2)
Power Tank 7 Amp-hour 12V DC rechargeable battery
by Celestron
Quantity:  
$69.95 
2.5 Amp AC adapter for Celestron telescopes
by Celestron
Quantity:  
$24.95 
Visual Accessories
Eyepieces (3)
Omni 6mm 1.25" Plossl
by Celestron
Quantity:  
$29.95 
Omni 15mm 1.25" Plossl
by Celestron
Quantity:  
$31.95 
Omni 40mm 1.25" Plossl
by Celestron
Quantity:  
$49.95 
  • 60mm fully coated refractor optics
  • Go-to computerized altazimuth mount with dual-axis DC servo motor drives
  • Pre-assembled adjustable height aluminum tripod
  • Accessory tray
  • Hand control with 4,000+ star and object database for go-to operation
  • Internal AA battery compartment (batteries not supplied)
  • Battery-powered variable brightness StarPointer red LED non-magnifying finder (battery supplied)
  • 1.25” rack and pinion focuser
  • 1.25” prism-type star diagonal
  • 1.25” 25mm eyepiece (28x)
  • 1.25” 9mm eyepiece (78x)
  • TheSky X – First Light Edition CD-ROM star-charting software for PC or Mac
  • Dust covers.
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Celestron - 60LCM 60mm f/12 achromatic go-to altazimuth refractor

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Celestron - 60LCM 60mm f/12 achromatic go-to altazimuth refractorFull length image of the Celestron 60LCM on its tripod.
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Our Product #: LCM60
Manufacturer Product #: 22050
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The Celestron 60LCM is a very affordable/very portable 60mm refractor on a battery-operated computerized go-to mount that will turn your starry nights into space odysseys . . .





. . . our 34th year